28 December 2015

A penitential day?

Those of you who, very sensibly, keep at least one eye on the illuminating St Lawrence Press ORDO will know that, before the liturgical tinkerings initiated by Pius XII, today, Holy Innocents' Day, the Mass was penitential: Violet colour; no Gloria; no Alleluia; Benedicamus Domino.

How very, totally, immensely, completely, indisputably, brilliantly suitable for a Day which has justly come to be an occasion of penance for our present politically-correct and on-going daily Holocaust, that of the pre-born. I wonder how many have already been finished off this morning in Oxford.

This sick age of ours craves Moral High Ground; so people luxuriate in the easy and cost-free deploring of a previous Holocaust; daft youths endlessly prose on about the rights of sodomites and eunuchs and demonstrate for the demolition of statues of people they hadn't heard of until yesterday. And, in an even greater access of diseased bloodthirstiness, they are programmed to shriek for the 'no-platforming' of anyone who does not chant their own slick up-to-the-minute Horst Wessel Song, "A Woman's Right to Choose".

Perhaps Ecclesia Dei, when it has finished obeying Cardinal Marx's lordly and arrogant demand to 'review' a Good Friday Prayer, could move on to 'reviewing' the liturgical arrangements for December 28.

10 comments:

Gregory said...

I find this day's sadness admirably presented via the haunting "Coventry Carol."

Zephyrinus said...

How absolutely brilliant, Fr, is your superb coverage of this issue.

It sums up, in my opinion, the desperate state of The Liturgy, Post-Vatican II.

No doubt, The Vatican will note, listen to, and implement, these much-needed Liturgical changes, and rectify the abhorrent destruction of The Church's beautiful heritage and Liturgy, built up over 1,600 years.

HONEST !!!

Ben Whitworth said...

The author of "De ecclasiasticis observationibus" (possibly Bernold of Constance) suggested that the Innocents are commemorated "minus festiue" than other saints because, having died before the Passion of our Lord, they descended "ad infernalem penam" at their death, to be liberated and glorified only on the day of the Resurrection. Durandus rejected this interpretation, since the same logic would have made the feasts of St John the Baptist quasi-penitential; rather, he suggested, on 28th December, the Church is trying to unite us with the feelings of the Innocents' grieving mothers.

Richard Down said...

one point about today - do the ministers use folded chasubles or dalmatics?

Patrick Sheridan said...

How bloody spiffing, padre, is your coverage of the issue. I congratulate you on your erudition! It encapsulates, in my view, the sorry state of post-Conciliar liturgy vis-a-vis the subversion of traditional praxis by the insubordination of high ecclesiastics the venerable Pius XII himself appointed when he was temporarily incapacitated. I have little doubt that the supreme ecclesiastical authority will implement a thorough revision of the liturgical changes and correct the abhorrent destruction of the immemorial sacrifice of the mass...[but I cannot presently understand the significance of "1,600 years."]

What a verbose, sycophantic and pretentious way of saying absolutely nothing!

You needn't publish this, father.

John R said...

Violet dalmatic and tunicle; it's not completely penitential owing to Christmastide and still being a "festal" Mass of sorts. Planetae plicatae won't return until the blessing and distribution of candles on Candlemas.

Gregory DiPippo said...

Dalmatic and tunicle. Childermass is not listed as one of the days when folded chasubles are used in the rubric "De qualitate paramentorum".

John Vasc said...

From the injunction against abortion contained in the Didache, we can deduce that it must have been an ingrained social evil in the earliest Christian times. And that infanticide soon after birth was also rife (?presumably more frequent than abortion?) in many parts of Europe and the known world during the Middle Ages. Is it possible that the '144,000' - St John's projection of the twelve tribes of Israel onto the new Christian communion of martyred saints - might have been intended by the 4th/5th century AD liturgists who instituted the Feast of the Holy Innocents to apply by extension to the innumerable infants thus piteously slaughtered? And perhaps the violet vestments to indicate our need for communal Reparation?

(Although against that conjecture I can find no hint in the Propers of the Mass apart from that startlingly large number in the Lectio. And as others have pointed out, during the Octave of Christmas penitence would be uncanonical)

ansgerus said...

Actually, I personally in the first moment thought our good, old priest might have gotten mixed-up the week days and took the Monday for Sunday, when he entered our chapel in red vestments...as indicated in the 1939-edition of the daily Missal for the celebration of the feast in case of Sundays, instead of the violet on weekdays. In our chapel, fortunately, there is a collection of daily Missal books in the pew, from various years dating back to the times of Pius XI, up to an edition from 1966, showing all the degeneration of the liturgy during this period. So, after end of the mass, I could confirm that he was right: red vestments, alleluja instead of the tract, and even the Gloria which was most striking for me, as in the old daily Missal it was explicitly written that "today the church omits even the Gloria in order to express her compassion with the young martyrs". Times changed maybe, a compassion with innocent young martyrs is not the intention of the church anymore, instead we shall sing alltogether happily the glory and the halleluja also on this day, like in case of the three Sundays of the now obsolete pre-lenten time.

John Vasc said...

PS - An amendment: my second sentence should begin "And from medieval accounts we know that infanticide soon after birth..." etc