26 March 2016

Knox's Exsultet


Here is a section of the translation of the Exsultet done by Mgr R A Knox, while he was still an Anglican:

The night is come, wherein, when our fathers, the children of Israel, were led forth from Egypt, thou dividest the Sea and madest them pass over as on dry land. Yea, the night is come, that with the fiery pillar hath purged away the darkness of our condemnation. The night is come, whereby all that believe in Christ on all the face of the earth, delivered from this naughty world and out of the shadow of death, are renewed unto grace and are made partakers of eternal life. The night is come, wherein the bonds of death are loosed, and Christ harrowing Hell rose again in triumph. For wherefore should man be born into this world, save that being born he might be redeemed? How wonderful then, O God, is thy loving-kindness unto us thy children! Behold, what manner of love he hath bestowed upon us: who, to redeem a servant, delivered up his only Son! O wonderful providence of Adam's transgression, that by such a death sin might be done away! O blessed iniquity [O felix culpa], for whose redemption such a price was paid by such a Saviour! ...

This has now been restored to use in the Ordinariate Missal, being used for the first time this Holy Week. I will make some comments a few minutes later this morning. But a couple of textual details:
(1) line 2: the Missal reads dividest; should it be dividedst?
(2) line 4: the Missal replaces naughty with wicked.

5 comments:

Timothy Graham said...

(1) "dividedest" certainly seems the correct tense, but would it feel a bit awkward? I have looked for the Knox text on-line but can't find it. Maybe "didst divide" would be smoother.

Paul Goings said...

So not exactly the Knox Exsultet?

Edwin said...

Certainly Timothy is right; 'didst divide' is much preferable.

Hierodeacon said...

It should certainly be dividedst - I was going to comment on that before reading your final paragraph - since the following verb is "madest." Put some people demur at -dst endings.

Austin said...

"Naughty" may be defunct in the old sense, but I prefer it. The covalence of "empty" and "bad" is telling. I used to look forward to it in the ordination services.