4 April 2015

Paschal Candles in grouped parishes

I would have put this on Fr Zed's blog if I knew how ... six parishes are grouped together and combining for one Vigil Mass in one of the six churches. How do the other five Paschal Candles get 'done'? A C of E document intelligently suggests that, while only one Candle may be blessed at the Vigil, representives of the other churches might, at the end of the Liturgy, bring up their candles to be lit from the flame of 'The' Paschal Candle, and then carry them in procession out of the church. Creates a link between ... etc. etc.. Not illegal, because it happens after the dismissal; 'extraliturgically'.

6 comments:

Joshua said...

In my experience, if a church or chapel doesn't have its own celebration of the Easter Vigil, then, if a Paschal candle will be used later on in that church or chapel (to be lit throughout Eastertide services, and at baptisms and funerals) - a suitable candle is simply bought and put in that Paschal candlestick, then lit and used without any blessing whatsoever. Not very nice, but a true account.

Victor said...

I think there is a special blessing for the easter candles to be done at the end of the vigil mass. At least I experienced it this way a few years ago in a parish that was grouped with three others, here in Germany. Not sure though whether this blessing is in the Book of Blessings - it might be a German creation.

Fr Joseph Taylor said...

Quite simple. One Paschal Candleinthe one church where the vigil takes place. The others go without. If anyonewith agreat devotion to the Paschal is disappointed,they can always visit thechurch with thecandle

Pastor in Monte said...

I'd love to know how these things were done formerly. I don't think that every church did the Ceremonies of the Triduum before the liturgical movement; indeed, the notification in Fortescue (and therefore in more authoritative sources) says that the bells of suburban churches should ring when the mother church of a town rings them at the Vigil's Gloria. This rather implies that the clergy combine for a Big Vigil and (probably) do without a paschal candle.
In the Sarum Use, the paschal candle was (in theory, at least, and therefore in bigger churches) so large that it burnt throughout Eastertide, and had to be initially lit from the triforium.

Matthew Rose said...

Ahh, yes, the thirty-six foot candle in Salisbury! Must have been a sight to behold!

Hierodeacon said...

Father, your suggestion is kind of like a Paschal Candle fermentum. I like it! And another commenter's description of bells at the Gloria reminds me of the beginning of the Paschal bells (and thus the beginning of Paschal Matins near midnight on the front steps of the church) in 19th century Moscow. The churches nearest the center of Moscow waited till they heard the bells of Dormition Cathedral before beginning to ring their own, and then the churches farther out began theirs... etc ... in concentric circles – not because these other churches weren't themselves also serving the Paschal Matins and Liturgy, but as a way to a remarkable urban liturgical unity.

Speaking of Paschal bells, it is also a Russian practice that bells be tolled all day long between morning and evening services every day of Bright Week. This gives children and other less skilled bell-ringers a fun opportunity not afforded them the rest of the year.