23 September 2015

Suppletory Liturgical Law: our Lady of Walsingham

In using the Extraordinary Form, a cleric is supposed to follow the Universal Calendar as modified by the local Calendar granted by the Holy See for particular Dioceses or Religious Orders, and to use the appropriate accompanying liturgical texts.

But since 1967, the (now, of course, non-existent) Sacred Congregation of Rites has not made provision for changing local needs by granting new local calendars for the Extraordinary Form. The English LMS ORDO wisely explains "Four dioceses have been created since 1962 and for these exist no appropriate calendars. To provide calendars [for them] ... the calendars of [dioceses] ... from whose territory respectively the new dioceses were created have been adopted with changes where appropriate". I suggest that this wise procedure is amply supported by the provisions of Canon 19 (quem vide). So, for a jurisdiction - for a diocese or whatever - which did not exist in 1961, one should create a Calendar along precisely the same lines which the Sacred Congregation of Rites used in doing this in the decades before 1961. This obviously applies as much to the Ordinariates as it does to new Dioceses.

I have a particular suggestion to make with regard to the Solemnity of our Lady of Walsingham, who is given as a Patron to the English Ordinariate and is to be observed on September 24. It is that those who use Mass and/or Office from the Extraordinary Form use the propers once provided in the Appendix pro aliquibus locis for the Feast of the Translatio Almae Domus BMV [the Holy House of our Lady of Loretto*] on December 10. An English translation of this Mass was regularly printed in the Pilgrims' Manual of the Anglican Shrine as the "Mass of our Lady of Walsingham" in the years after the reconstruction of the Holy House in 1931** until the shift in liturgical fashions after 1967. One very minor adjustment was made: the omission from the Collect of the words eamque in sinu Ecclesiae tuae mirabiliter collocasti [referring to the wondrous translation of the Loretto Holy House from Palestine to safer climes].

My proposal may seem to you the less radical when you have mulled over this fact: the English Mass of our Lady of Walsingham, which we used as a Votive at our Ordinariate Pontifical Mass on September 19 2015 (celebrated by Archbishop di Noia, adjunct Secretary of the CDF), and is provided in the Ordinariate Missal, uses the Collect and Secret*** from that December 10 Mass adjusted as I described above (and the Post Communion appears to be a modified version of the one there provided). A powerful nod and an expressive wink.

Fr Hope Patten and Fr Fynes Clinton****, I am confident, beam down upon us with much approval as we use this liturgical provision. They know where it is that their Patrimony is now incarnated! Quorum animabus propitietur Deus! Qui Dominum pro nobis deprecentur!

EXTERNAL SOLEMNITY (Extraordinary Form)
On the Sunday before or after the Solemnity of OLW, two Masses (or one high/sung and one low) are allowed of OLW, with a commemoration of the Sunday. Those whose memories retain such things as octaves will probably find it more natural to do this on the Sunday after the Solemnity. (But Office is still of the Sunday.) The Mass may, of course, be used as a Votive on any day when the rubrics permit votives.

* This Mass and Office seem to date from the pontificate of Pope Innocent XII (1691-1700).
** Nearly 400 years after the destruction of the old Holy House.
*** Just think of those thousands of devout priests during those three and a half decades who stood in the smoky atmosphere of candles and lamps within the Holy House and, as it dawned outside, murmured those same words which Archbishop di Noia sang at the High Altar of Westminster Cathedral.
**** It will have been Fynes who sorted out the Mass of OLW; Patten was no latinist.

8 comments:

Brian M said...

Father (or others), if one wanted to use the 1960 Roman Breviary (or 1963 Monastic Diurnal) to pray the Office of OLW on Sept 24, what propers should one use?

Fr John Hunwicke said...

Tricky. You simply have to find an edition of the Breviary from before 1960 which has at the back, bound in, the Appendix pro aliquibus locis. Perhpa someone more into technology than I am could copy something onto the thread???

As far as Mass is concerned, ditto. My Altar Missal is 1955 and has the Appendix at the back.

Tarquinius said...

I know not of any Breviary with an Appendix pro aliquibus locis, but this gentleman here posted the propers a while ago. You would have to adapt them to the 1960 rubrics, though, if you are very strict in these matters.

Brian M said...

I think I have it, Father:

https://books.google.com/books?id=F1wuAAAAYAAJ&dq=breviarium+romanum+heimalis&pg=PR235#v=onepage&q=breviarium%20romanum%20heimalis&f=false

Tarquinius said...

I also saw it here: https://www.yumpu.com/la/document/view/39938580/7-aliapdf-essanorg/25
Should be found in any Appendix pro Italia et Insulis adjacentibus.

Brian M said...

Here are the propers in Bute's English translation:

https://books.google.com/books?id=nvVYAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=bute+breviary&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CDgQ6AEwAmoVChMI1MOgmtaPyAIViHE-Ch0KqAFI#v=onepage&q=1230&f=false

Hierodeacon said...

Father John, is 24 September the mediaeval date for Our Lady of Walsingham? Why was this date chosen?

Fr John Hunwicke said...

No, Father Hierodeacon, it isn't (and therefore might not be deemed appropriate for an Orthodox Calendar). This date, I think, originated in the post-Conciliar Calendar granted to the English RC Church. This date was probably chosen because it was the date for our Lady of Ransom on the older Roman Calendar, and there was a tendency in the 1960s to avoid the multiplication of Marian feasts by 'repackaging' some of them for new needs.

The earlier Anglo-Catholic date was October 15, date of the Translation of the statue to the new shrine in 1931. There was a large Orthodox participation in the dedication of the big extensions to the original shrine church in 1938, June 6-7