17 March 2015

ORDO query

The LMS ORDO, admirable guide for those who use the 1962 Missal or Breviary, envisages S Patrick having only a Commemoration at Lauds and Low Masses today (I am talking about England, Wales, and Scotland).

I wonder why this is. In the 1940s, the English, Welsh, and Scottish dioceses differed greatly, some hardly noticing S Patrick, while a dozen or so classed him as a Greater Double just like S Gregory on the 12th. In the changes which came in with the 1960s, one would expect the 'Grd' to convert into a '2 Class'. And I have a 1969 ORDO, from the very eve of the disappearance of the old Calendars, in which S Patrick is a '2 cl' in the whole of Great Britain (1cl in Ireland, Commemoration "outside the British Isles").

I wonder if those me in his rebus valde doctiores would care to comment. It is of course not a minor detail, of interest only to those who need to be told to get a life, since upon it rests the question of whether S Patrick is actually noticed liturgically today (except by a mere commemoration after the Lenten collect etc.).

(In the 1940s Calendars, there seems no rhyme or reason about which British dioceses noticed S Patrick: Liverpool, for example, failed to do so! Incidentally, "All dioceses in Scotland" used a rather attractive Mass Egredere [cf Genesis 12:1-2]. And, in the 1940s, the Gospel of the Lenten Feria did duty as the Last Gospel.)

11 comments:

Rose Marie said...

Ah, such complications in the British Isles. Here in these United States, today is a Commemoration in the Novus Ordo calendar. Accordingly, our pastor appeared in glorious white and used the proper Collect, rather, Opening Prayer.

Who thought up the names for the elements of the propers in the NO? "Collect" evokes the gathering of our needs to lay before the Altar, but "Opening Prayer" is just that, no more. The evocations of Matins, Lauds, and Vespers have also been lost. Pardon me, I should not be grumpy on St. Patrick's Day!

Rubricarius said...

A Clifton Ordo I have for 1956 has St. Patrick as a double.

Ttony said...

Father, it is a Greater Double in England and Wales in the 1863 and 1876 Almanacs, with no specific diocesan commemoration. A Plenary Indulgence was available in E&W. Before the Restoration of the Hierarchy it will have been a Semidouble as in the Roman Calendar.

It is interesting that in the Supplement for Ireland in hand missals of 1846 and 1888 he is described as Apostle or Patron "of the Whole Kingdom", which I take to mean the Protestant parts of the Kingdom of Ireland as well as the Catholic parts.

Rubricarius said...

I have had a quick perusal of the excellent 'Tablet' archives. From 1969 going backwards St. Patrick is clearly 'II Class' - as the new-speak goes. His feast is there in preference to the feria except in 1962 when Ember Saturday takes precedence. Likewise he was not transferred in 1963 when the 17th was Lent 3. (Interestingly, in 1967 St. Joseph was anticipated on Saturday 18th.) The apparent 'II Cl' status goes back to 1960 as for 1959 St. Patrick is listed in the same type face as St. Cyril.

I suggest that there must have been a submission to Rome c. 1959 about raising the rank of St. Patrick (and possibly others) when the effects of RI were considered.

Chris said...

"Collect" has no root in the Latin that I can see, though - all the books I can find (Sarum as well as Roman stricto sensu) simply term it "Oratio" - prayer. Although given its history in English liturgy I am more than willing to be corrected.

Joshua said...

Meanwhile, throughout the Commonwealth of Australia, St Patrick's Day is a Solemnity (1st class feast); and St Patrick is Patron of the Archdiocese of Hobart also. Conveniently, I was able to attend the Archbishop's Mass yesterday.

Fr John Hunwicke said...

Brilliant, Rubricarius! It never occurred to me to go to the Tablet archives.(I noticed the other day on an Orthodox blog, the Tablet being referred to as an Anglican publication ...)

GOR said...

Yes, interesting how St. Patrick’s feast was dealt with liturgically in various places. Growing up in Ireland in the distant past there was little doubt as to where he stood. His feast was – and still is, I believe – a Holyday of Obligation. As it was also a National Holiday there was no excuse for not attending Mass – and most people did.

Churches were packed and “Hail Glorious St. Patrick” was the ‘National Anthem’ of the day, sung lustily everywhere – much like “Faith of Our Fathers” was sung in England. There were some modest parades – primarily in larger cities. The most green to be seen was the Shamrock – worn by everyone.

While “drowning the shamrock” was advocated, it wasn’t the drink-fest it has become (thank you, America!). It wasn’t as if we needed a special day to have a “drop o’ the craythur” - we had 364 other days for that as well. It is sad to see what one of the primary religious Holydays of the past has become.

Today, more than ever, Ireland – and the Church - needs his patronage:

“In a war against sin, in the fight for the faith,
Dear Saint, may thy children resist to the death;
May their strength be in meekness, in penance, and prayer,
Their banner the Cross, which they glory to bear.”

Monica said...

Apropos Rubricarius' mention of 17 March 1963 being the 3rd Sunday of Lent, I distinctly remember as a 12 year old choir boy just before Mass (in the North East of England), our curate coming in to say that the bishop had authorised one Mass to be of St Patrick that day. Accordingly, so, the Sung Mass of the Feast was celebrated in his honour - the choir master ad-libbed the Propers from his missal (as there'd been no preparation) and the setting of the Mass was Cyril Vaughan's 'Mass of St Patrick'. Needless to say, Hail Glorious St Patrick was sung by all at the end.
Just one bit of trivia regarding this important day.

Monica said...

Apropos Rubricarius' mention of 17 March 1963 being the 3rd Sunday of Lent, I distinctly remember as a 12 year old choir boy just before Mass (in the North East of England), our curate coming in to say that the bishop had authorised one Mass to be of St Patrick that day. Accordingly, so, the Sung Mass was celebrated in his honour - the choir master ad-libbed the Propers from his missal (as there'd been no preparation) and the setting of the Mass was Cyril Vaughan's 'Mass of St Patrick'. Needless to say, Hail Glorious St Patrick was sung by all at the end.
Just one bit of trivia regarding this important day.

halfwaybetweenfearandlove said...

Father, bless!

In Chapter I.3 of the Changes in the Roman Breviary and Missal to Conform with the New Code of Rubrics, issued by SCR on 26 July 1960, we read:

"Feasts which are indicated in the calendars as greater or lesser doubles ... become henceforth feasts of the 3rd class."

Given the preference of the Lenten feria to 3rd class feasts, the Apostle of Ireland is automatically, and sadly, reduced to a mere commemoration except where his feast is of the 1st or 2nd class.